Bar B Bar Ranch

Photo: Leine Stikkel

Photo: Leine Stikkel

154 Acres | protected since 2007
The Bar B Bar Ranch lies along a free-flowing stretch of the Snake River north of Jackson, dotted with patches of cottonwood forest and home to two prime elk migration corridors. Since the original 520-acre ranch was subdivided, the Land Trust has partnered with landowners to protect five lots at the Bar B Bar to date.

Bar BC Ranch Meadow

 

Photo: Kim Fadiman


Photo: Kim Fadiman

507 acres | protected since 2006
The 1,300 acre Bar BC Ranch, originally homesteaded over 100 years ago, was one of the first dude ranches in Jackson Hole. The Bar BC Meadow easement protects an incredible scenic vista at the head of Spring Gulch, as well as habitat for mule deer, elk, moose, and other native species.

Bar Cross

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: JHLT

500 Acres | protected since 2007

The property lies on the east side of Wyoming Highway 352 approximately 5 miles north of Cora, Wyoming.  It includes irrigated meadows, sage uplands and significant stretches of the New Fork River and Willow Creek. The New Fork is designated a Class 3 trout fishery of regional importance by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. The ranch provides valuable habitat for a variety of wildlife, including crucial winter and yearlong habitat for moose.

Brown’s Green River Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: JHLT

2,026 acres | protected since 2006
The ponds and wetlands near Forty Rod Creek and the Green River on the Brown’s Green River Ranch in Sublette County provide important habitat for wildlife year round. Extensive stream restoration and habitat enhancement projects on both aquatic systems have created important habitat for a variety of fish species, including Snake River cutthroat, Bear River cutthroat and Colorado River cutthroat. The prairielands between the Green River and Forty Rod Creek riparian corridors provides an important migration corridor between these two important habitats.

Broken Arrow

 

Photo: Kim Fadiman

Photo: Kim Fadiman

62 Acres | protected since 1997
The Broken Arrow Ranch was protected by a conservation buyer who partnered with the Land Trust on several large easements in the Hoback River drainage, a tributary of the Snake River. The ranch is important migration habitat for elk, mule deer, and moose, and is owned and operated by the City Kids to Wilderness Project, a camp for inner city youths.

Circle EW Ranch

 

Circle EW Ranch

Photo: JHLT

32 Acres | protected since 1986
The Circle EW Ranch is the most northerly piece of private land on the southern end of Grand Teton National Park, adjacent to the Snake River – just south of Moose and the Murie Center. Once a ‘fishing camp’, the easement on the property was donated by the late Liz McCabe, an avid fisherwoman, photographer, adventurer, and character of the valley

Circle Shoe Ranch

Photo: Leine Stikkel

Photo: Mimi King

33 acres | protected since 1989
In addition to Fish Creek, a prominent side channel and spring creek flow through this property, providing habitat for cutthroat trout and the diversity of wildlife that use riparian areas. Immediately adjacent to Hardeman Barns and the Fish Creek Ranch, it is part of a horseshoe of protected properties surrounding the town of Wilson.

Elk Camp

 

River Springs - Rendezvous Park

Photo: JHLT

102 Acres | protected since 1999
Located in the heart of the Snake River riparian corridor east of the Jackson Hole Airport, this property provides pristine habitat for cutthroat trout, bald eagles, and a host of riparian species – and, as its name indicates, elk migrating between the National Elk Refuge and Grand Teton National Park. It is bordered by national park lands to the west.

Emily’s Pond

 

Emily's Pond

Photo: Jonathan Selkowitz

11 Acres | protected since 1997
Now a treasured public access open space owned by Teton County, Emily’s Pond was once an abandoned rock quarry littered with trash. It took the vision of Emily Stevens, a private landowner and conservationist, to transform it into a place for quiet recreation and enjoyment by the whole community.

Fall Creek Road 1 – Hofley

 

Photo: JHLT

Photo: JHLT

22 acres | protected since 2006
This property is bordered by protected lands on nearly all sides and lies in the ecologically-rich bottom lands of the Snake River. A barn from the White Grass Ranch and a log home originally belonging to the Ward family in Wilson, built in the late 1890s, are found on the property.

Fall Creek Road 2 – Opler

 

Fall Creek Road - Opler

Photo: SelkoPhoto

9 Acres | protected since 1998
This property in the Rivermeadows subdivision along Fall Creek Road sits astride a beautiful bench overlooking the Snake River with sweeping views of the Teton Range. A gully on the property provides a protected and relatively invisible movement corridor for wildlife.

Feuz Ranch

 

Fuez Ranch

Photo: Kim Fadiman

105 Acres | protected since 2003
The Feuz Ranch has a longtime ranching heritage and is visible from both the Buffalo Valley Road and Highway 287/26. It was protected in partnership with the Forest Service with support from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Fish Creek Ranch

 

Fish Creek Ranch

Photo: JHLT

381 Acres | protected since 1996
A spectacular conservation property along Fish Creek south of the town of Wilson with spawning habitat for cutthroat trout, the Fish Creek Ranch easement was donated by Gil and Marge Ordway, who first conserved this property in 1975, later transferring the easement to the Land Trust.

Flat Creek Corridor

 

Flat Creek Corridor

Photo: Jonathan Selkowitz

40 Acres | protected since 2010
The Flat Creek Corridor Project conserves prime wildlife and riparian habitat along Flat Creek, and protects community access to a beloved trail system on the northwest slope of Snow King Mountain. This centrally-located property has been conserved in phases through a partnership between the Land Trust and the Town of Jackson.

Flat Creek Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: JHLT

140 acres | protected since 1986

15 miles up the Flat Creek drainage, deep in the Gros Ventre wilderness at the end of a jeep road, this remote ranch has a colorful history – and a pristine stream and lake for trout fishing. A romance between a countess and a cowboy in the 1920s is part of the ranch’s founding story, which remains in the family to this day and is operated as a dude ranch.

Flying Fish Hook

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: JHLT

1,528 | protected since 2007
The ranch contains over two miles of Silver Creek, and lies along the 150 mile Red Desert to Hoback mule deer migration route. Owners report seeing 200-300 mule deer a day on the property during their migration, as well as a variety of other animals throughout the year. The property borders BLM land to the north, east, and south.

Four Lazy F Ranch

 

Emily's Pond

Photo: Kim Fadiman

282 Acres | protected since 1998
The 4 Lazy F Ranch, also known as the Poodle Ranch, is an iconic, pastoral property located on the eastern end of Highway 22 just south of Spring Gulch – part of a scenic corridor of protected lands along Highway 22. The top 40 acres of “High School Butte”, which can be seen from many points in the valley, is also protected by an easement with the 4 Lazy F Ranch.

Granite Ridge

 

Emily's Pond

Photo: Kim Fadiman

127 Acres | protected since 1994
This scenic open space located just north of Teton Village along the Moose-Wilson Road shares a one-mile long boundary with Grand Teton National Park. Part of the Snake River Ranch, it is mostly open pasture land grazed by cattle, but also includes some of the lower slopes of Rendezvous Mountain and a quarter mile of Granite Creek.

Gros Ventre Confluence

 

Gros Ventre Confluenec

Photo: Kim Fadiman

76 Acres | protected since 1997
This conservation property, located at the confluence of the Gros Ventre and Snake Rivers, is an ecologically-rich haven for wildlife characterized by riparian lands, a spring creek, and thick stands of cottonwoods. Raptors, songbirds, moose, deer, and elk are among the many wildlife that frequent the property. It is also provides spawning habitat for Snake River cutthroat trout.

Hardeman Barns & Meadows

 

Hardeman Barns

Photo: Mary Gerty

177 acres | protected since 1989
The historic red ranch buildings of Wilson known as Hardeman Barns were protected from becoming a 70-unit subdivision through an incredible community effort. Over 1,000 people – one tenth of the valley’s population at the time – attended the Western-themed carnival fundraiser in support of the Hardeman Campaign.

Hatchet Ranch

 

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Photo: Jansen Gunderson

680 Acres | protected since 1991
The Hatchet Ranch is located in Buffalo Valley, just east of Moran Junction. It was first homesteaded in 1892, and is named after the Hatchet Brand used these early homesteaders. It continues to be operated as a working cattle ranch.

Huidekoper Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 
Huidekoper Ranch

Photo: Kim Fadiman

138 Acres | protected since 1997
Forested hillsides, open meadows, and agricultural lands characterize this 138-acre ranch located on the bench above the town of Wilson and adjacent to the vast Bridger-Teton National Forest and several other Land Trust protected properties. The ranch was protected by an easement donated by Virginia “Ginny” Huidekoper, adventurous valley legend, and continues to be operated and managed by her heirs today.

Indian Springs Ranch

 

Indian Springs Ranch

Photo: Mary Gerty

833 Acres | protected since 1995
The Indian Springs easements span both sides of Highway 22 between Jackson and Wilson, providing scenic views in both directions. The northern portion houses the Teton Science Schools’ Jackson Campus, and the southern portion has wide open agricultural lands interspersed with aspen and cottonwood groves and riparian areas.

Jenkins Ranch

Jenkins Ranch

Photo: Mary Gerty

391 acres | protected since 1982
Blue Crane Creek, which flows through the Jenkins Ranch, is a spawning stream for native Snake River cutthroat trout. Each fall, the ranch resonates with the sounds of bugling elk that find shelter and good habitat in the South Park area of the valley. The Jenkins Ranch easements were among the first to be completed by the newly established Land Trust.

John Dodge

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: JHLT

18 acres | protected since 1988
This property lies within the Natural Resource Overlay and is a crucial winter range for moose and mule deer. It lies within the Snake River Riparian corridor and has both riparian forest and wetland areas. The protected property allows for migration between different ranges for a variety of species.

Karns Meadow

 

Karns Meadow

Photo: Mary Gerty

41 Acres | protected since 2003
The 41-acre Karns Meadow is incredibly important to wildlife that need room to roam and access to habitat in the town of Jackson, where development is more concentrated than in outlying rural areas – in 2008, a family of foxes denned in the meadow along Flat Creek and drew quite an audience. In addition, as a wetland and riparian area, Karns Meadow provides ecosystem services by filtering stormwater runoff and buffering flooding.

Ladd Property

Ladd Property

Photo: JHLT

19 acres | protected since 2000
Located at the far end of Fish Creek Road – close as the crow flies to Rock Springs, the Snake River Ranch, and Teton Village – the Ladd Property lies up on the hillsloped part of the range above the valley floor known as the Teton Front. A beautiful mix of conifers and open meadows, the easement leaves the land in a natural state, as does another easement by the Ladd family nearby.

Long Ridge

 

Long Ridge

Photo: Jay Lunsford

78 Acres | protected since 2014
Located in our Wind River Program area, this recently-protected property is highly-visible from Highway 26/287 southeast of Dubois. The Wind River runs along the base of the colorful Dubois Badlands here, and in the winter it provides critical habitat for bighorn sheep, mule deer, and antelope. Anglers making use of a WGFD access easement on the land also enjoy fishing this stretch of water.

Mead & Hansen Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 
Mead and Hansen Ranch

Photo: Drew Rush

591 Acres | protected since 2001
The dramatic expanse of open space known as Spring Gulch has a rich and colorful ranching history. Much of the land in its southern half has been ranched by the Mead and Hansen families for over four generations. The new 380-acre ‘Spring Gulch Meadows’ conservation project, completed in 2015, continues this family legacy of ranching and conservation.

Munger Mountain

FIELD STUDY

 
Munger Mountain

Photo: Leine Stikkel

771 Acres | protected since 2002

Rising above the banks of the Snake River at the southern end of the valley, much of the lower flanks of Munger Mountain is protected by Land Trust easements on private property that is part of the “Lower” Snake River Ranch – the upper elevations are Forest Service lands. The new 236-acre Munger Mountain Corridor partnership project, completed in 2014, safeguards a key migration corridor used by elk.

National Museum of Wildlife Art

National Museum of Wildlife Art

Photo: Daniel Meyer

35 Acres | protected since 1995
The National Museum of Wildlife Art, on the northeastern side of East Gros Ventre Butte, is surrounded by protected lands and highly visible from the Town of Jackson and the National Elk Refuge. The northern 35 acres of the Museum property is protected by an easement that provides crucial habitat for mule deer and habitat for a diversity of birds including many raptor species.

Neilson Ranch

 

Neilson Ranch

Photo: Kim Fadiman

769 acres | protected from 1985 to 1993
The Neilson Ranch in the South Park area makes up the southern portion of a protected corridor of nearly 4000 acres running to the northern end of the Walton Ranch. Protection of this property contributes to the health of the Snake River riparian corridor and the wildlife – cutthroat trout, moose bald eagles, elk, and migratory songbirds – that depend on it.

Poison Creek

National Museum of Wildlife Art

Photo: Kim Fadiman

37 acres | protected since 1997
Bighorn sheep and other large game species find winter haven on this public access property. Located up the Hoback River drainage and accessed off the main highway, the Poison Creek property is a former inholding that was transferred by the Jackson Hole Land Trust to the Bridger-Teton National Forest in 2013.

R Lazy S Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 
R Lazy S Ranch

Photo: Kim Fadiman

349 Acres | protected since 1981
The R Lazy S Ranch was the first easement donated to the newly-formed Jackson Hole Land Trust. Through a series of conservation easement donations, Howard and Cara Stirn protected their entire ranch, located just east of Teton Village in the Snake River riparian corridor and bordering Grand Teton National Park.

Red Rock Ranch

 

Red Rock Ranch

Photo: David Stubbs

473 Acres | protected since 2001
The Red Rock Ranch up the Gros Ventre is a picturesque guest ranch of red cliffs and wide open spaces. Nearly three quarters of the ranch, which is surrounded by the Bridger-Teton National Forest and adjacent to the Gros Ventre Wilderness – and a major pronghorn migration route – is permanently protected by a series of easements donated by the MacKenzie family.

River Springs – Rendezvous Park

 

River Springs - Rendezvous Park

Photo: Jonathan Selkowitz

40 acres | protected since 2011
The Land Trust and a private foundation partnered to protect this 40-acre property along the banks of the Snake River across from Emily’s Pond. Located at the nexus between Jackson, Wilson, and Teton Village, the property, formerly a gravel pit, has been transformed into a treasured natural park for the community of Jackson Hole.

Ring Lake Ranch

Photo: David Stubbs

414 acres | protected since 2009
The Ring Lake Ranch, located in the Torrey Creek drainage in our Wind River Program area, provides important habitat and migration corridors for the Whiskey Mountain bighorn sheep herd – and rock faces with petroglyphs etched long ago by the Mountain Shoshone tribe. Its wide open expanses provide renewal for guests of the retreat center operated on the property.

Rock Springs JHMR

FIELD STUDY

 
River Springs - Rendezvous Park

Photo: JHLT

211 acres | protected since 1997
Rocks Springs Canyon, a favorite out-of-bounds run for Jackson Hole Mountain Resort backcountry skiers and yurt guests (as well as black bears, moose, elk, mule deer, and raptors) has been protected by an easement that allows recreational uses and a backcountry yurt, but eliminates any future development.

Rocking H Ranch

 

Photo: Jonathan Selkowitz

43 acres | protected since 1998
This historic ranch, located along the banks of the Snake River east of Teton Village, is owned by the Huyler family. A signature red barn with the Rocking H brand sign and a historic cabin are located on the property – as is habitat for more than 100 species of birds.

Seven Mile Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: JHLT

952 acres | protected since 2006
The easement covers multiple parcels and serves to protect a vast riparian area. Its trees, willows, and meadows give you a sense of why this area was chosen for homesteads and rendezvous 150 years ago. Moose and antelope are just two of the many animals that enjoy the property, and are visible from the highway. From the ranch visitors will also experience amazing views of the Wind River and Wyoming mountain ranges.

Snake River Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: Ted Wood

1,845 acres | protected since 1984
Much of the scenic vistas and ranchlands on the approach to Teton Village and Grand Teton National Park along Highway 390 is protected by a series of easements on the Snake River Ranch. The ranch, bought sight unseen by Stanley B. Resor in 1929, continues to be managed as a working cattle ranch by his family today.

South Park Road Property

 

River Springs - Rendezvous Park

Photo: JHLT

42 Acres | protected since 1996
This property is an important easement in the South Park area because of its tremendous scenic value atop the highly visible Huffsmith Hill. Additionally, it is adjacent to the Snake River riparian zone, which is important habitat for moose, bald eagles, elk, trumpeter swans, and many of the valley’s wildlife species. The easement was donated by landowners that wished to protect the magnificent views in all directions.

Spring Creek Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: Leine Stikkel

338 acres | protected since 1984
Over 300 of acres of the ridgeline and western flanks of East Gros Ventre Butte were conserved and donated to the Jackson Hole Land Trust as part of the development plan for the Spring Creek Ranch Resort. In addition to habitat for wintering mule deer, moose, and elk, the perspective from the ridge offers sweeping views into the National Elk Refuge and Spring Gulch.

Three Spear Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: Kim Fadiman

1,213 acres | protected since 1995
The Three Spear Ranch easement was our first in Fremont County, in what we later established as our Wind River Program area in 2007. This expanse of open lands in the heart of Wind River Country borders state and federal conservation areas, and provides wildlife habitat protection on truly a landscape-level scale.

Town of Wilson Easements

FIELD STUDY

 
River Springs - Rendezvous Park

Photo: Kim Fadiman

26 acres | protected from 1995 to 2008
The Wilson Soccer Fields, Wilson Centennial Ponds, and Wilson Wetlands Trail allow people to access and learn about protected open space and wildlife habitat right in the town of Wilson.

Torrey Lake Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: JHLT

940 acres | protected since 2010
The Torrey Lake Ranch’s 940 acres were added to the broad landscape of protected properties in the Torrey Creek Drainage, including the adjacent Ring Lake Ranch. This property includes nearly five miles of lakeshore and creek habitat, and historic log and rock cabins dating to the 1920s.

Trail Creek Ranch

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: Kim Fadiman

280 acres | protected since 2000
Betty Woolsey, an Olympic skier and local legend, was ahead of her time in many ways – skiing, horseback riding, and rock climbing in the 1930s and 40s. Drawn to the Tetons, she bought the Trail Creek Ranch in 1942, owning and operating it as a guest ranch, and had the vision to protect it for future generations through a conservation easement with the Land Trust.

Walton Ranch

 

River Springs - Rendezvous Park

Photo: Mack Mendenhall

1,840 acres | protected from 1983 to 2000
The largest easement in Teton County, the Walton Ranch stretches as far as the eye can see along the Snake River north of Highway 22. Donated by Paul and Betty Walton in 1983, it was of the first easements secured by the Jackson Hole Land Trust in its early days.

Valley Springs Ranch

 

Photo: Kim Fadiman

61 acres | protected from 2000 to 2007
The Valley Springs Ranch, owned by Teton County, the Wyoming Wetlands Society and the Wilson family is highly visible from S. Hwy 189/191 and provides natural wetland and riparian habitat for waterfowl and a corridor for wildlife movement – as well as a captive breeding program to restore trumpeter swans.

ZZYZX

FIELD STUDY

 

Photo: David Stubbs

38 acres | protected since 2014
This property lies along the Snake River and features a variety of habitats, including spruce and cottonwood forests, as well as riparian wetlands. It serves as an important transitional habitat for moose, deer, and elk between their seasonal ranges. The Snake River Riparian Corridor, of which ZZYZX is a part, is also an important bird migration corridor and provides forage and places to hide for both herbivores and large carnivores.